Global Climate Change Alliance

Summary

The Global Climate Change Alliance (GCCA) is an initiative of the European Union. Its overall objective is to build a new alliance on climate change between the European Union and the poor developing countries that are most affected and that have the least capacity to deal with climate change. The GCCA does not intend to set up a new fund or governance structure, but is working through the European Commission’s established channels for political dialogue and cooperation at national and international level.

Details on our Data
  • Latest confirmation received from Fund Managers: June 2017
  • Contributions data and Projects data is as of June 2017.
  • The source of funding is the EC budget, the European Development Fund, and EU member states.

Basic Description

Name of Fund The Global Climate Change Alliance (GCCA)
Official Fund Website http://www.gcca.eu/
Date Created Date fund proposed: 2007

Date fund become operational: 2008

Proposed Life of Fund Initial funding period was for a three year period, 2008 – 2010. However, as of January 2014, the GCCA is still operational and it is currently working on the identification and formulation of new actions.
Administrating Organisation European Commission – Directorate-General for Development and Cooperation – EuropeAid
Objectives The Global Climate Change Alliance (GCCA) was launched in 2007 by the European Commission to strengthen dialogue and cooperation on climate change between the European Union (EU) and developing countries most vulnerable to climate change, in particular Least Developed Countries (LDCs) and Small Island Developing States (SIDS), which are hardest hit by the adverse effects of climate change.

The GCCA acts as a platform for dialogue and exchange of experience between the EU and developing countries on climate policy and on practical approaches to integrate climate change into development policies and budgets. The results of dialogue and exchange of views feed into the discussions on the post-2012 climate agreement under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), and inform the technical and financial cooperation supported by the GCCA. Discussions take place at global, regional and national levels.

The GCCA also provides technical and financial support to partner countries to integrate climate change into their development policies and budgets, and to implement projects that address climate change on the ground, promoting climate-resilient, low-emission development. Technical and financial cooperation, in turn, informs political dialogue and exchange of experience at regional and global levels.

The five GCCA priority areas include:

■ Mainstreaming climate change into poverty reduction and development strategies

■ Adaptation, building on the National Adaptation Programmes of Action (NAPAs) and other national plans

■ Disaster risk reduction (DRR)

■ Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD)

■ Enhancing participation in the Global Carbon Market and Clean Development Mechanism (CDM)

For more information, see http://www.gcca.eu/about-the-gcca

Activities Supported The GCCA is a global alliance, involving a wide range of partners across the world with a focus on helping the most vulnerable developing countries to more effectively address the challenges associated with climate change. The GCCA rests on two pillars:Platform for dialogue and cooperation:

■The GCCA fosters dialogue between the EU and developing countries on climate policy. It also supports exchange of experience on practical approaches to integrate climate change into development policies and budgets, recognising that developing countries often face similar climate change issues.

■The results feed into the discussions on the post-2012 climate agreement under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), and inform the technical and financial cooperation supported by the GCCA.

■Dialogue takes place at global, regional and national levels.

■Technical and financial support:

■The GCCA provides technical and financial support to targeted developing countries to integrate climate change into their development policies and budgets and to implement adaptation and mitigation interventions, with a focus on five priority areas, as described below.

■To find the best solutions for tackling climate change, the GCCA works with government departments and agencies, regional organisations, non-governmental organisations, academic and scientific institutions, and local representations of international organisations, multilateral and bilateral development agencies – pooling resources, expertise and knowledge.

■The technical and financial support in turn informs the dialogue and exchange of experience at regional and global levels between the EU and partner countries.

Technical support in five priority areas:

■Mainstreaming climate change into poverty reduction and development efforts: The GCCA supports the systematic integration of climate change considerations into national development planning, from policymaking and budgeting to implementation and monitoring. This priority area, which focuses on institutional strengthening, is often combined with another priority, in particular adaptation.

■Adaptation: The GCCA aims to help improve knowledge about the effects of climate change and the design and implementation of appropriate adaptation actions, in particular in the water and agriculture sectors, that reduce the vulnerability of the population to the impacts of climate change. The GCCA builds on National Adaptation Programmes of Action (NAPAs) and other national plans.

■Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD): The GCCA supports solutions to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from deforestation and create incentives for forest protection, while preserving livelihoods and ecosystems depending on forests.

■Enhancing participation in the global carbon market: The GCCA aims to promote a more equitable geographic distribution of financing opportunities linked to the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) by building the capacities of partner countries to access this source of funding, particularly in the field of energy.

■Disaster risk reduction (DRR): The GCCA seeks to help developing countries to prepare for climate-related natural disasters, reduce their risks and limit their impacts.

Conditions and Eligibility Requirements The GCCA provides support to poor developing countries most vulnerable to climate change, particularly the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) and Small Island Development States (SIDS) using a set of eligibility criteria:

  • Eligibility of a country for funding under the GCCA. The country must belong to either the group of Least Developed Countries (LDCs) or the group of Small Island Developing States (SIDS) recipients of aid (in line with the official OECD/DAC and UN lists).
  • Vulnerability of the country to climate change. In particular risk related to floods, droughts, storms, see level rise or glacier melting and the coastal zone elevation with proportion of the population at risk. The importance of the agricultural sector, being one of the most sensitive sectors, is also taken into account.
  • The adaptive capacity of the country.
  • Policy Context. Ideally, the country should have national and/or sectoral climate change policies in place or expressed its intention of preparing them to ensure the integration of climate change into development strategies, plans and budgets. The government is keen to enhance policy dialogue and cooperation on climate change with the EU and donors more widely. Last, the country should preferably be involved with and be politically active in the negotiations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and in this sense serve as a model for other countries in its group/region.

Funds are allocated based on population figures and on availability of funds.

There is also the possibility of supporting a regional approach, when deemed more appropriate than a country approach (e.g. due to the small size of the countries) and if the absorptive capacities of the regional organisations allow it. Funding levels are then decided on case by case based on needs, absorptive capacities and availability of resources.

In addition, training and technical assistance services related to climate change are available for government agencies of ACP countries, through the GCCA’s Intra-ACP Programme.

Accessing the Fund Government agencies not benefiting from GCCA technical and financial support, but willing to engage in such a programme, should formally express their interest through the EU Delegation to their country. The EU Delegation, in collaboration with the EC’s headquarters, will check whether the partner country meets the selection criteria for GCCA funding and whether funds are available. In parallel, a dialogue can start on possible areas of intervention and priorities. Should no funding be available, countries may be put on a ‘waiting list’ until new funding becomes available.For more information, see http://www.gcca.eu/about-the-gcca/how-to-participate/#gvtparticipate

Fund Governance

Decision Making Structure 
The GCCA is a joint initiative that was put forward in 2007 by the Directorates General for Development, Environment and External Relations. The GCCA is implemented by Directorate-General for Development and Cooperation – EuropeAid. The Commission proposes that EU Member States collectively support the GCCA.
Non-Government Stakeholder Participation A third of GCCA-funded programmes include a component aimed at financing activities put forward by civil society organisations (including NGOs, community-based organisations, private sector organisations, etc.). In such cases, organisations are invited to submit project proposals – which are first screened against eligibility criteria, then evaluated on the basis of pre-determined quality criteria. Depending on the objectives and planned activities of a given programme, other opportunities to get involved may also include participation in consultative processes (e.g. on policy aspects, on options for a national REDD strategy), involvement in capacity building activities (e.g. on sustainable forest management, on climate-compatible agricultural practices), or implementation of activities targeted at enhancing public awareness of climate-related issues and responses.

To find out about opportunities interested parties can check whether there is a GCCA-funded intervention in their country from the section on technical and financial support of the GCCA website and if interested can get in touch with the organisation in charge of implementing the programme or the EU Delegation.

Information Disclosure
The Financial Status of the GCCA is in part available on the GCCA website and shared on demand / quarterly through Climate Funds Update.
Issues Raised
Unknown.

Relationship with Official Development Assistance

Inclusion as Official Development Assistance Yes.
Financial Instrument/ Delivery Mechanism Used (e.g. grant, loan) Funding is released solely through grants.
The aid modalities used by GCCA interventions up to 2013 are the following:

  • Project: 77%
  • Sector budget support: 8%
  • General budget support: 8%
  • Sector policy support programme: 8%
Nature of Recipient Country Involvement Governments of developing countries can get involved in the GCCA by participating in the policy dialogue on climate change with the European Union, at the national level or in the context of regional and global initiatives. This dialogue can take various forms, e.g. the identification of areas for closer collaboration, joint participation in work forums linked to the negotiations on the future international climate regime, or the preparation of a joint declaration such as the joint statement issued by the EU, Least Developed Countries and the Alliance of Small Island States (AOSIS). The 2014-2020 programming process for EC external cooperation also offers opportunities for dialogue and action: indeed, 20% of the new funding made available from the EU budget (including external cooperation programmes) will have to be earmarked for interventions that contribute to the transition to a low-carbon and climate-resilient society.

With regard to the GCCA’s second pillar, i.e. technical and financial cooperation, there are two ways in which a partner country government can contribute to a GCCA-funded programme: by taking an active role in programme preparation and implementation, and by co-financing the GCCA programme.

Relevant ministries, government agencies and other public institutions are involved in all countries in which a GCCA-funded programme has been approved – from the stage of identification and formulation to the stage of implementation, monitoring and evaluation. For example, partners in the implementation of Tanzania’s GCCA programme include the Ministry of Finance, the Vice-President’s Office, the Institute of Rural Development Planning, the Sokoine University of Agriculture – and, at the local level, Community Forests Pemba (the latter being an NGO).

In addition, many governments co-finance GCCA programmes, usually in kind, and sometimes also by explicitly allocating resources from their budget. This is the case, for instance, in Belize, Jamaica, Mali or Mozambique.